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    HK (WE) 3PX4 GBB Pistol


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    HK (WE) 3PX4 Pistol review by Booligan
    Discuss this review HERE



    Table of Contents:
    Introduction
    Ordering
    Basic Gun Information
    First impressions/Packaging
    Included
    Gun Specifications
    Externals
    Trademarks
    Magazines
    Performance
    Internals
    Modifications
    Pros/Cons
    Overall

    Introduction:
    The "3PX4" is one of the newest GBB pistols on the market, and today we'll be taking one of the first detailed looks at it. This modern pistol design features a polymer frame with unique features such as interchangeable backstraps, front rail, aggressively checkered front and rear straps, and an ambidextrous safety switch that doubles as a decocker. This bargain priced pistol is now available in US stores, so keep reading for more information on this interesting pistol!

    Ordering:
    I obtained this pistol through Evike, who is selling it as two separate components, the frame with magazine and the metal slide, each priced at $50, making the total price of the pistol $100. The frame is available HERE, and the metal slide is available in either Black or Chrome. The slide is compatible with the TM model, so it can be used as an upgrade as well. Spare magazines are available HERE, priced at $24. It shipped out the day I ordered it, showing up two days later using UPS ground, which is Evike's free shipping option.

    Basic Gun Information:
    As mentioned before, the "3PX4" is a full sized GBB pistol that uses a polymer frame with the aforementioned features, and a metal slide. It uses a rotating breach barrel system that rotates the barrel about 45 degrees as the slide goes back. The pistol is relatively light and compact, with a 4" outer barrel. Unfortunately, there aren't too many tactical holster options out on the market right now, but as the real steel model gets adopted by more agencies, I foresee more accessories becoming available. It is listed on some websites, including Evike, as being made by WE, but I believe it's just being distributed as a WE gun to ease it into the US market.

    First impressions/Packaging:
    The gun comes packaged in a cardboard box with white styrofoam inner liner. The box has artwork depicting the chrome slide model. The only manufacturer markings on the box are "H.K", which is featured a few times on the box. I was very impressed with the gun when I pulled it out of the box, as it had a very good weight and it felt great in my hands. The finish looked great, similar to the real steel model that I almost purchased a few weeks ago.

    From this point on, click on the thumbnails to view full size photos
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    Box

    Included:
    Along with the gun itself, a single magazine is included, as well as three interchangeable backstraps and a basic manual showing how to operate the gun. It also includes an exploded parts diagram and list to show you how everything goes together.

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    Manual
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    Operating directions
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    Parts diagram

    Gun Specifications:
    Weight: 1.9 lbs
    Length: 7.5"
    Width: 1.2"
    Height: 5.4"
    Sight Radius: 5.8"

    Externals:
    As mentioned previously, this is a full metal replica, as it has the same metal content as the real firearm. The slide, outer barrel, and all fire controls are made of metal, with the frame being a high strength polymer. The overall build quality is pretty great, with a nice matte black finish lending to the realistic appearance.

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    Overview, right side
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    Overview, left side

    The grip is one of the key parts of what makes this gun special, as it features three interchangeable backstraps to adjust it to fit various hand sizes. The inside of the straps are marked as being S, M or L, allowing you to easily know which size you're using. There is a button located on the bottom of the grip, behind the magazine well that you push to remove the backstrap. The front and back straps of the grip have aggressive checkering to help you keep a great grip on the gun.

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    Grip
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    Three included backstraps
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    Push this button to remove the backstrap
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    Backstrap removed

    Moving forward on the frame, you'll run into the fire controls, which consist of the trigger, ambidextrous safety levers located on the frame, magazine release, slide lock, and disassembly lever. The controls are all metal, and have a fairly good, albeit somewhat fragile paint job. The trigger pull, while in single action, is light and smooth, with about a 9mm pull length. You can decock the gun with the safety switch, switching it over to double action mode. When you do that, the trigger pull is lengthened to about 20mm, and the pull weight is increased a bit. Once decocked, you can cock it again to return it to single action mode. The magazine release can be switched for right or left handed use by pushing up on the spring retainer inside the grip and pushing the button assembly out, replacing it to the other side as needed.

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    Controls
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    Trigger in double action mode
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    Single action mode
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    Safety off
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    Safety on, when this is done, the hammer decocks
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    Takedown lever, located on both sides

    Moving forward still on the frame, you'll find the 20mm rail, which is about 1.8" long and has a single locking notch towards the front. It fits the NCStar pistol light pictured later on in the review perfectly. The bottom of the railed dustcover has a metal serial number plate that is not unique to each gun.

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    20mm rail

    The metal slide houses the blowback unit, and inner/outer barrel assembly. As mentioned previously, the gun does use the correct rotating barrel lock like the real gun, adding a bit of realism to this pistol. The slide features front and rear serrations for easy cocking. Embedded in the slide are the removable front and rear iron sights, and I believe these can be replaced with the upgrades available for the TM model.

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    Slide
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    Breach
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    Slide pulled back, exposing chamber

    The outer barrel is metal and has inner threading identical to the WE 1911 series. The orange tip is an orange plastic plug that is easily pulled out to install the threaded insert available at various retailers.

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    Outer barrel
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    Slide pulled back
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    Orange tip

    Trademarks:
    The gun has fairly realistic trademarks, including caliber markings and non-individual serial numbers. The trademarks are all deeply engraved and molded into the slide and frame, and there is a metal serial number insert located on the bottom of the rail.

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    Grip markings
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    Left sided slide markings
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    Right sided markings
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    Barrel markings
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    Frame mounted serial insert

    Magazines:
    The included magazine holds 25 rounds, and holds enough gas to fire multiple BB loads out of a single gas load. In my testing, I actually got between 2.5 and 3 BB loads out of a single BB fill, which is great for a GBB pistol with a metal slide.

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    Magazine
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    Feeding bits

    Performance:
    Chrono results using Matrix .20g BBs and propane, shot through a Madbull V1 chrono, after a 200 round break in period:
    High FPS: 276.4 FPS
    Low FPS: 269.8 FPS
    Average FPS: 271.5 FPS

    FPS consistency is astounding, only deviating 6-7 FPS from first shot to last in a magazine load of BBs, with 1-2 seconds between shots. This consistency allows you to have very consistent accuracy.

    Range and accuracy were quite good, especially for a low FPS pistol with a somewhat short barrel. The hop-up puts a good amount of spin on the BB, and I got my best results using Matrix .23g BBs. Using that ammo, I was able to hit a man sized target at 110' easily, with 10" groupings coming in at 80' or so. As a sidearm, it's great, and for CQB use, it's quite impressive.

    Internals:
    Disassembly of this gun is a piece of cake, only requiring you to remove the magazine and pull down on the disassembly levers located in front of the trigger. This will allow the slide to come off, allowing you access to the major parts of the gun for cleaning and maintenance.

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    Disassembled

    The frame is polymer but with a metal insert for strength. The gun has a very wide striker, allowing it to hit the valve on the magazine evenly without any threat of breaking.

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    Hammer assembly
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    Inner metal frame

    Inside the metal slide, you'll find the outer barrel with inner barrel installed, recoil spring and rod, and blowback system. The inner barrel is 6.03mm in diameter, and is about 90mm long. The gun uses a split type hop-up arm for great consistency. The blowback unit is largely made out of plastic, with metal reinforcements surrounding the unit itself.

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    Slide
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    Slide components
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    Inner barrel and hop-up
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    Hop-up adjustment dial
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    Hop-up chamber
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    Blowback unit

    Modifications:
    As far as modifications go, you're fairly limited to rail mounted lights/lasers and barrel mounted accessories. Luckily, it uses the readily available WE 1911 threaded barrel insert, allowing you to add your choice of muzzle device. On mine, I've installed a small can and NCStar flashlight, both of which worked perfectly. Due to the rotation of the barrel when firing, you'll need to tighten the can on there quite well, to prevent it from backing itself out.

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    Can installed
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    With light and can

    Pros:
    Full metal replica of a fairly rare gun
    Incredibly affordable - $100
    Great consistency out of the box
    Accurate enough to be a sidearm or CQB primary
    Able to mount a muzzle device fairly easily
    Interchangeable backstraps allow for user customization

    Cons:
    Paint finish on slide and controls rubs off fairly easily
    Spare mags are available, but since there is no model sharing, they could be hard to find
    Exposed gas fill valve on the bottom of the mag could allow dirt to foul it up
    Not a lot of holsters available

    Overall:
    I wasn't really sure what to expect with this pistol, as it's a new model from an unknown manufacturer, but it really exceeded my expectations. It looks and feels great, and it shoots extremely well. This unique pistol is great as a skirmish piece, or even as a wall hanger for collectors. I'm looking forward to seeing what else this mystery manufacturer can whip up!

    Many thanks again to Evike, and of course, Airsoft Retreat!

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