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    JG MAC-10 AEP Submachine Gun


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    JG MAC-10 AEP Review by Booligan





    Table of Contents:
    Introduction
    Ordering
    Basic Gun Information
    First impressions/Packaging
    Included
    Gun Specifications
    Externals
    Trademarks
    Magazines
    Performance
    Internals
    Modifications
    Pros/Cons
    Overall

    Introduction:
    Ever since AEPs first hit the scene, manufacturers have been fitting the compact, full metal gearboxes in a variety of configurations into compact submachine guns. From the MP7 to the Skorpion, you could find this compact firing system in a wide variety of guns, and one of my favorites is the MAC-10. I previously owned the TM MAC-10 AEP, and I regretted selling it for years. I was thrilled to see that JG was releasing their newest version of the MAC-10 AEP, especially with the fact that it was coming to the US. Now, I have the latest version in front of me, so let's take a look at this gun's finer points!

    Ordering:
    I obtained the MAC-10 through Airsoft Atlanta, who has it priced available HERE, priced at $109.99. It was quickly dispatched to me, thanks to Airsoft Atlanta's same day shipping, and it arrived a few days later, safe and sound using UPS Ground. Airsoft Atlanta also has spare magazines, both hi-cap and low-cap TM models, internal and external upgrades, and batteries in stock, so you can fully kit out this thing in one stop.

    Basic Gun Information:
    The TM MAC-10 is a polymer bodied AEP type submachine gun, featuring a compact full metal gearbox, metal extendable stock, and a massive mock silencer that really completes the look and feel of this gun. It's bulky, uncomfortable, quite unattractive, and frankly, I wouldn't change a thing about it. It fits the personality of the real MAC-10 very well.

    First impressions/Packaging:
    The MAC-10 arrived unsurprisingly in a cardboard box, complete with a high density foam inner liner to with individual cutouts for the gun and its various accessories. When I pulled it out of the liner, I was really happy to see how good of a job JG did replicating the TM MAC-10 in that the weight and feel were both just as I remembered with my old TM. It felt right at home.

    Click on the individual thumbnails to see the full size photos

    th_DSC_7317.jpg
    Box art. I love Airsft guns.

    Included:
    Along with the SMG itself, JG included the aforementioned mock silencer, 7.2v battery and charger, small bag of BBs, and a very thorough manual, as it is a direct copy of the TM. Not included, unfortunately, is the front strap or barrel tool, however, the barrel tool isn't necessary with the plastic muzzle that this comes with.

    Gun Specifications:
    Weight: 2 lbs 8 oz – 3 lbs 10 oz (1.12 kg – 1.65 kg)
    Length: 10.5 – 31" (probably the biggest spread that I've ever seen)
    Width: 2.25"
    Height: 12"
    Sight Radius: 8.3"

    Externals:
    The JG MAC-10 is comprised almost entirely of plastic, aside from a few key parts which help with the strength and weight balance. The metal parts are the front strap mount, magazine, and folding/retractable stock assembly, with pretty much everything else being made of plastic. The gun is finished with a matte black finish with a matte black rubberized finish on the mock silencer.

    th_DSC_7294.jpg
    External overview, left side
    th_DSC_7305.jpg
    Overview, right side

    The stock is a retractable unit which folds at the rear to rest on top of the receiver. The sliding arms are made of non-ferrous metal and the actual shoulder hoop is made of steel. To extend the stock, you squeeze the shoulder hoop and rotate it down, followed by pushing the button at the bottom of the receiver to extend it. It's not very comfortable at all to shoulder, but it is quite solid in either position. You can remove it entirely by extending it fully, then pushing the button again to pull it off.

    th_DSC_7306.jpg
    Stock folded
    th_DSC_7307.jpg
    Stock extended
    th_DSC_7315.jpg
    Stock removed

    The receiver of the MAC is basically one big rectangle with a few parts attached to make the gun function. It's not pretty, but it's quite functional in that it does a great job holding everything all together. You can access the hop-up adjuster by pulling back the cocking handle.

    th_DSC_7300.jpg
    Receiver, left side
    th_DSC_7302.jpg
    Receiver, right side
    th_DSC_7303.jpg
    Hop-up adjuster exposed after pulling back the cocking handle

    The pistol grip is quite uncomfortable due to the fact that it's basically a large vertical rectangle. The back strap has a contoured design, but still, it's not comfortable, especially if you have small hands. The magazine fits into the grip and is released using a lever located at the bottom of the grip.

    th_DSC_7295.jpg
    Pistol grip

    There are two separate selector switches on the gun, one for safety and the other to select your fire mode. The safety switch is located to the right of the trigger and is quite stiff. The selector switch on the left side of the receiver allows you to switch between semi and full auto in a 180 degree sweep. The trigger pull is long but light with a consistent AEG type engagement.

    th_DSC_7297.jpg
    Safety switch
    th_DSC_7298.jpg
    Selector switch

    The outer barrel, if you want to call it that, is made of orange plastic and is terminated in special threading for this mock silencer. Unlike the TM and the overseas JG MAC-10s, the US bound model does not have a separate 14mm- threaded front section. Included with the gun is the massive mock silencer which doubles as your foregrip. At the muzzle, you'll find a metal loop that is designed to mount a front strap which is included with the TM model but sadly missing on this one. The mock silencer is able to be opened at the front just like on the TM, however, it is not foam filled.

    th_DSC_7304.jpg
    Orange muzzle

    Aiming the MAC-10 is a bit of a futile exercise, as the rear sight is a simple hole in the rear plate and the front is a non adjustable wide post that is mostly blocked by the cocking handle. Just aim down the barrel and you'll be good to go.

    th_DSC_7319.jpg
    Rear sight
    th_DSC_7320.jpg
    Front sight

    The battery compartment is accessible by removing the entire front assembly off the receiver. To free it, you just click the gun to safe and push the large front pin to the side, which will pop the whole front assembly off.

    th_DSC_7316.jpg
    Front assembly removed
    th_DSC_7318.jpg
    Battery partially inserted

    Trademarks:
    There are no real-steel trademarks to be found on this SMG, however, JG did include their new logo on the mock bolt. There is also a serial number underneath it, and a quick check is showing that it might be unique to each gun.

    Magazines:
    The included magazine is a full metal hi-cap which holds 470 or so rounds in it. This is kind of a funky choice of magazine, as the battery only provides enough juice for 500-1000 shots or so, so you might find yourself changing batteries nearly as often as you change magazines. The gun is compatible with the TM 65 round mags, so you can get those instead.

    th_DSC_7308.jpg
    Hi-cap magazine
    th_DSC_7312.jpg
    Feeding end
    th_DSC_7313.jpg
    Winding wheel

    Performance:
    Performance after a 500 round break-in, and Airsplat .20g ammo is as follows:
    High FPS: 305.2 FPS
    Low FPS: 289.4 FPS
    Average FPS: 300.6 FPS

    Range and accuracy isn't as miraculous as the TM MAC-10, which regularly got 150'+ range out of a low velocity and short barrel, however, it was still quite good, especially after giving the hop-up and inner barrel a thorough cleaning. I was comfortable putting shots out to 125' onto a torso sized target, and they still seemed to have a fair bit of power behind them at that range when they hit, unlike the TM which floated the BBs out there so slowly that your target could pretty easily avoid the shot.

    Rate of fire with the included barrel is kind of a bummer, only coming in at 10 RPS on the nose, or 600 RPM. This is roughly half the real gun's 1145 RPM, so for realistic performance, you'll need to go with a few upgrades.

    Battery life with the stock battery is between 500-1000 rounds per charge, depending on the temperature for the most part. In my testing here in 90 degree heat, I'm getting around 800 per charge.

    One thing to note is that this gun is very quiet when firing, especially when you're more than 30-40' away. This thing is going to do a lot of damage in night games, that's for sure!

    Internals:
    Inside the MAC-10, you'll find a special AEP type metal gearbox, which appears to be the same type tucked inside the MP7. It uses a special 4 gear system and is fitted with nylon bushings. It uses a short piston assembly with a ported cylinder, optimized for the short barrel length. Getting to the gearbox is quite simple, only requiring a few screws to be undone, however, I did not have the correct sized Torx bit to crack the gearbox itself. I'll be updating this once I can actually get this thing open.

    th_DSC_7322.jpg
    Top of the frame removed, gearbox and hop-up shown
    th_DSC_7324.jpg
    Gearbox, left side
    th_DSC_7326.jpg
    Gearbox, right side
    th_DSC_7323.jpg
    Gearbox and hop-up assemblies

    The MAC-10 uses a very well designed top adjustable hop-up assembly which is easily adjusted and holds its selected position very well. The gun doesn't have a separate hop-up nub, instead using two plastic prongs that extend onto the bucking for an H-type contact. Mine was pretty greasy, however a quick cleaning helped out my range and accuracy. The inner barrel is about 131mm long and is a special AEP cut design. Upgrades are available at Airsoft Atlanta both for the barrel and bucking.

    Modifications:
    Due to the fact that this gun is a TM clone, there are quite a few modifications out there for this platform. Internal upgrades are available, including high quality parts made by PDI and Nine Ball. One modification that I'll be attempting in the next few weeks is to set up the battery compartment for an internal 7.4v LiPo pack, which appears to be an easy job. There are two accessible battery wires that you can easily solder on a compact Deans connector and fit with a very small LiPo pack. This will give you better ROF as well as battery life.

    Pros:
    Affordable MAC-10 AEP!
    Decent compact SMG performance out of the box
    Includes mock silencer which really adds to the look of the gun
    Comes as a full package with battery and charger
    Comes with hi-cap magazine, even though that's kind of a strange mag choice
    Retractable stock assembly is relatively sturdy
    Upgrade parts are available in the US through Airsoft Atlanta

    Cons:
    SLOW ROF
    Entire threaded muzzle is orange plastic
    Accuracy was a little wonky until I gave the barrel and bucking a good cleaning
    Battery life isn't great, which is what I normally see with AEP batteries

    Overall:
    I had owned the TM MAC-10 for a while and found it to be one of my favorite AEP type submachine guns. Unfortunately, I had an offer come up that I had to take, and it left my hands, something I regretted for a long time. As soon as I found out that JG was going to make their version of it, I was thrilled, to say the least. I was concerned that it wouldn't make its way to the US, but Airsoft Atlanta proved me wrong by picking it up soon after it launched overseas. I'm happy to have a MAC-10 back in my collection, and I know that with a few small tweaks, this thing will absolutely destroy in CQB, night games, and anywhere else a stealthy submachine gun will excel.

    Many thanks again to Airsoft Atlanta, and of course, Airsoft Retreat!

    2 comments:

    Don Swelgin said...

    Add the following to run an alternate battery like an 8.4 NiMH or 7.4 Lipo in a PEQ Box:

    Nine Ball MP7 Conversion Adapter for External Battery
    http://www.airsoftatlanta.com/Nine-Ball-MP7-Battery-Adapter-p/58320.htm

    Of course, you would need a small PEQ Box and a way to attach it to the side of the gun. Works well though.

    Don Swelgin said...

    Another good one: How do you get the blessed thing apart to check it out internally? I see you had your apart and I am not quite sure how mine pops apart.

    Appreciate the info.