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    VFC VR16 CQBR SOPMOD


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    VFC VR16 CQBR SOPMOD AEG Review by Booligan



     

    Table of Contents:
    Introduction
    Ordering
    Basic Gun Information
    First impressions/Packaging
    Included
    Gun Specifications
    Externals
    Trademarks
    Magazines
    Performance
    Internals
    Modifications
    Pros/Cons
    Overall

    Introduction:
    VFC is pretty widely known as the manufacturer of some of the finest AR pattern AEGs currently on the market. Their bodies are gorgeous, internals are well executed, and performance is ready to hit the field out of the box. They've just launched their newest series, the VR16 line made up of several different AR configurations, and today, we're looking at the CQBR SOPMOD model. Having previously customized VFC's E-Series M4, how will this new model compare? Stick around and let's find out!

    Ordering:
    Jag Precision is the primary US importer of these new VFC AEGs, and they sent this one to me for this review. It is currently available at most major airsoft retailers including Airsplat, Airsoft Megastore, and Airsoft GI MAP priced currently at $339.99. It includes a 30 day limited warranty against manufacturer defects in case you have any problems with the gun out of the box. Info on the gun can be found HERE.

    Basic Gun Information:
    The VR16 series is a line of full metal M4 type AEGs available in a variety of barrel, rail, and stock configurations. They actually have 15 different models currently available from tiny little pistols all the way to DMR type rifles. They feature VFC's best gearbox components with absolutely gorgeous metal bodies in addition to all of VFC's standard features such as the slim pistol grip, locking bolt catch, etc. This model is rear wired and features VFC's new rotary adjustable hop-up system. This specific model is designed after the classic CQBR SOPMOD with a Crane type stock, 10.5" barrel, two piece rail kit and a fixed front sight. It's a timeless design, working well as a base gun for a custom buildup or as a period correct gun for certain Special Operations loadouts.

    First impressions/Packaging:
    The VR16 that was sent to me did not come with a retail package, instead arriving wrapped in bubble wrap and tucked inside a shipping box. I frequently get prototypes and guns like this from Jag Precision, and I'm certainly not complaining! They send over cool guns that I then get to review and trick out for your enjoyment! That being said, when I pulled the VR16 out of the box and unwrapped it from the bubble wrap, I was extremely impressed with the way the gun felt in my hands as well as the gorgeous new trademarks.

    Included:
    Along with the AEG itself, the VR16 comes with a metal 120 round midcap magazine and three rail covers to keep your hands from being cut on the rails. I don't believe a battery or charger will be included with the retail packages, so plan on purchasing your own before use.

    Gun Specifications:
    Weight: 6.25 lbs
    Length: 28" - 30.75"
    Width: 2.1"
    Height: 10.25" (sight to mag)
    Sight Radius: 14.8"
    Length of Pull: 12" - 14.75"

    Externals:
    The VR16 is a full metal replica, as everything that would be metal on the real gun is metal on the AEG. The only non-metal components are the Crane style stock and pistol grip. The whole gun is finished in a gorgeous matte black color that makes it look nearly identical to my real AR.

    Click on the individual thumbnails to see the full size photos

    th_DSC_1822.jpg
    External overview, left side
    th_DSC_1823.jpg
    Overview, right side

    The stock is a Crane type unit fitted to a metal 5 position buffer tube. It features a removable rubber butt pad to allow access to the battery compartments on either side. To install a battery in the buffer tube, you'll need to remove the whole stock, which only takes a second.

    th_DSC_1824.jpg
    Stock
    th_DSC_1825.jpg
    Rear wired to a mini-Tamiya plug

    The buffer tube is mated to the lower receiver with an angled sling mount plate sandwiched in between. The lower receiver is a standard M4 type unit with the controls located where you would expect them to be. The selector switch is located on the left side and can be cycled between safe-semi-full with a solid click at each point. The magazine release is a real-steel type unit located on the right side. The functional bolt catch is located on the left side and can be depressed to release the bolt when it's pulled back.

    th_DSC_1827.jpg
    Receiver, left side
    th_DSC_1826.jpg
    Receiver, right side
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    Sling mount plate

    The upper receiver is a standard M4 unit with a non-functional forward assist and a spring loaded dust cover which pops open when you pull back the charging handle. It has laser engraved T-marks on top for consistent optic placement.

    th_DSC_1831.jpg
    Upper receiver, bolt locked back

    The pistol grip is VFC's custom slimline unit which is much thinner than a normal AEG grip. It has a flat head motor height adjustment screw and an unventilated grip plug. It's a very comfortable grip, and is compatible with aftermarket grips if you so desire.

    th_DSC_1828.jpg
    Pistol grip
    th_DSC_1829.jpg
    Motor adjustment screw

    The handguard is a metal two-piece design with proper laser engraved markings for consistent accessory installation. On my sample, the handguard does have some slight rotational free play, a degree or so in either direction. Underneath the handguard, you'll find a two piece barrel system with hex screws on either side that will require occasional tightening if the barrel gets loose. It is terminated in a 14mm- threaded muzzle and on my sample, a metal flashhider.

    th_DSC_1832.jpg
    Handguard
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    Proper markings
    th_DSC_1835.jpg
    Metal flashhider installed on 14mm- threaded muzzle

    Aiming the CQBR is accomplished using the "chopped" rear sight which is adjustable for windage and elevation, and the fixed front triangle sight which is adjustable for elevation. The rear sight requires no tools for adjustment, but the front requires an AR front sight tool. The upper receiver also has a top rail for mounting optics of your choosing.

    th_DSC_1836.jpg
    Rear sight
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    Front sight
    th_DSC_1838.jpg
    Top rail

    Trademarks:
    VFC's new trademarks look great, deeply engraved with unique serial numbers. There are also markings on the left side of the receiver indicating that the gun is made by VFC in New Taipei City, Taiwan. The overall look is quite subtle, but looks great.

    th_DSC_1839.jpg
    New trademarks
    th_DSC_1840.jpg
    VFC markings

    Magazines:
    The included magazine is a 120 round mid-cap, made out of metal with a slightly gray finish. It requires a bit of a whack to get locked into the gun, but once there, it fits very securely. Feeding was perfect in my testing, no double feeds or failures to feed with this magazine. The magwell is a little snugger with other M4 AEGs, but I didn't have many issues fitting aftermarket magazines.

    th_DSC_1842.jpg
    Included midcap magazine
    th_DSC_1843.jpg
    Feeding end

    Performance:
    Performance after a 500 round break-in, using Echo 1 .20g ammo is as follows:
    High FPS: 390.1 FPS
    Low FPS: 382.8 FPS
    Average FPS: 386.2 FPS

    Rate of fire will vary depending on the battery that you select, but using my standard Tenergy 11.1v 1000 mAh 20C pack, I got 21 RPS on the nose. One thing that I will note, the gun sounds very smooth while firing, even at this high rate of fire.

    Range and accuracy, when fed with heavier weight ammo, in my case, some Echo 1 .25g BBs, were pretty good, however, I noticed a consistent break to the left with my shots. I disassembled the hop-up, cleaned everything up, and reset it, ensuring that everything was properly centered, and my shots were much more consistent. With this heavier weight ammo and the hop-up properly adjusted, I was placing shots on my torso sized target out to 165' with 90% consistency. The hop-up unit has plenty of power to apply hop to even the heaviest ammo I could throw at it, but it does run into a bit of a FPS wall at ranges past 165'.

    Internals:
    Accessing the gearbox is a relatively simple affair, only made slightly more complicated by the functional bolt catch which must be removed prior to unscrewing the magazine release. After that, the thing comes apart like any other M4 AEG.

    th_DSC_1849.jpg
    Gearbox

    The V2 gearbox is fitted with solid 8mm bushings, a metal selector plate, and a convenient little window to unlock the anti-reversal latch. This little window is a very handy feature if you ever have the gun lock up on you or to release spring tension before opening up the gearbox.

    th_DSC_1850.jpg
    8mm metal bushing and AR latch window
    th_DSC_1852.jpg
    Right side of the gearbox

    Inside the gearbox, you'll find steel gears fitted with a sector chip and VFC's self shimming system. The piston is made of translucent blue polymer with an aluminum piston head. The 2nd tooth is shaved off giving you a great angle of engagement and the last tooth is steel for durability. The gun is well greased with VFC's "baby poop" grease which actually does a good job, but looks like a dirty diaper exploded inside the gearbox. The airseal is, to put it mildly, perfect. If you plug the air nozzle, you can't press the piston into the cylinder at all. Simply perfect.

    th_DSC_1853.jpg
    The guts
    th_DSC_1855.jpg
    Steel gears fitted with a sector chip
    th_DSC_1856.jpg
    Spring self shimming system
    th_DSC_1858.jpg
    AOE is very good for a stock gun
    th_DSC_1859.jpg
    Piston
    th_DSC_1860.jpg
    That grease...
    th_DSC_1862.jpg
    Aluminum cylinder head

    The VR16 is fitted with VFC's new rotary adjustable hop-up unit which is quite stiff to turn and actually has slight clicks at each position. It is fitted to a 275mm long inner barrel with some of the deepest crowning that I've ever seen.

    th_DSC_1844.jpg
    Hop-up and inner barrel
    th_DSC_1845.jpg
    Hop-up unit
    th_DSC_1847.jpg
    Standard bucking design
    th_DSC_1846.jpg
    Extremely deep crowning

    Modifications:
    Like the E-series that I previously tested out, I'll be tricking this gun out quite a bit and using it to test out a few parts. I was going to turn this into a stubby little M4, something like a MK18, but I think I'll be turning it into a long range precision rifle instead.

    Pros:
    Full metal construction
    High strength polymer furniture
    Sub $350 price
    Excellent shot to shot consistency
    Skirmishable performance out of the box
    Consistent rotary style hop-up
    Includes a mid-cap magazine, not a rattly hi-cap
    Rear wired with plenty of battery space in the buffer tube and crane stock

    Cons:
    Some handguard wobble
    Still uses VFC's self shimming system, which I'm not the biggest fan of
    Magazine requires a solid whack to lock into place
    Multi-piece outer barrel setup requires occasional tightening

    Overall:
    I've never been disappointed with a VFC AEG, period. They've always had great bodies, consistent performance, and high quality internals, and the VR16 is no different. VFC did a fantastic job putting together this line of guns, and Jag Precision made a smart decision bringing them into the US. Whether you're looking for a gun that will run reliably without any modifications, or something that you want to customize and trick out into your own perfect rifle, the VR16 series should absolutely be towards the top of your list.

    Many thanks again to Jag Precision, and of course, Airsoft Retreat!

    1 comments:

    Ryan and Jessica said...

    Just curious why your not a fan of Vfc self shimming gearbox. Unreliable? Not smooth? Just curious. dont know much about them.